Yahoo hires pregnant CEO

I like to stay in the rhythm of things.

My maternity leave will be a few weeks long and I’ll work throughout it.

~ Newly-hired Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer (pictured right with husband Zach Bogue), commenting on the news that she is six-months pregnant with a baby boy, as quoted by MSNBC’s Market Day, July 17

19 thoughts on “Yahoo hires pregnant CEO”

  1. Her attitude differs from that of some people I know.  I have a friend who is happy he lost his telemarketing job.  He is much more relaxed living on unemployment.
    I know someone else who would love to lose his job as a cook and go on either disability or unemployment. 
    Several people I know, including several men, have little attachment to work in the paid labor market.   

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  2. Impossible. Pregnancy is a debilitating disease that stops a woman from being able to achieve anything in life. 

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  3. JDC says:
    July 19, 2012 at 9:06 am
    Impossible. Pregnancy is a debilitating disease that stops a woman from being able to achieve anything in life. 

    (Denise) I know a lot of men who feel that they aren’t achieving that much.  Some are jobless and others hate their jobs. 

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  4. hAHAHA. That reminds me when I was pregnant, almost ready to drop, with my first child. I mentioned to a friend, who already had kids, that I just wanted to have this baby so my life could get back to normal!

    HAHAHA.
    Stil lwaiting. 

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  5. It took me “a few weeks” just to get my nipples to stop hurting!  Maybe Marissa should sit down with Pink for a little reality chat!

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  6. What amazes me is that Yahoo! has enough life in it to draw her away from her tenure at Google. 

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  7. Well good for her. And I hope her husband helps her out so she can get some rest and be able to work. The first few weeks are rough especially if you have a colicky baby like my second was. 

    I am blessed I didn’t have to work this second time. Not knocking any woman who wants to. I just know for me I was content to enjoy each second of his newborn life. It goes by so fast.  

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  8. After only a week off, she might get hooked on a soap opera’s exciting plotlines and not want to return to her paid job.

    I saw a program about a man who was a construction worker and got laid off. He was so hooked on soaps that he didn’t even want to look for paid work. His wife also did not engage in paid work and the family survived on welfare. 

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  9. She should do whatever she wants as long as it doesn’t harm her baby. I’m sure she has the resources to make certain her child will be well cared for no matter where she is, so safety of the baby will not be in question.

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  10. I always used to think that by now there’d be more workplace daycare.  I used to envision it that parents could have lunch with their kids and check in on them during the day.  Why not?  Maybe this lady will make it happen at yahoo and start a trend.

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  11. ninek says:
    July 19, 2012 at 12:23 pm
    I always used to think that by now there’d be more workplace daycare.  I used to envision it that parents could have lunch with their kids and check in on them during the day.  Why not?  Maybe this lady will make it happen at yahoo and start a trend.

    (Denise) Good idea!  Also webcams in pre-schools. Let parents see what’s going on and keep their children safe!

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  12. LOL Denise!  Confession: when I had my first child 13 years ago, I was home during the day for the first time in my LIFE!  I was absolutely fascinated with daytime TV!  I was couch-bound trying to master breastfeeding.  And I would flip the channels and just marvel at things like Jerry Springer, Maury Povich, and the soaps!  I didn’t think this stuff was real!!! Thankfully, my dd grew up and wanted to go outside and play!  Phew!

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  13. Jamie says:
    July 19, 2012 at 4:01 pm
    LOL Denise!  Confession: when I had my first child 13 years ago, I was home during the day for the first time in my LIFE!  I was absolutely fascinated with daytime TV!  I was couch-bound trying to master breastfeeding.  And I would flip the channels and just marvel at things like Jerry Springer, Maury Povich, and the soaps!  I didn’t think this stuff was real!!! Thankfully, my dd grew up and wanted to go outside and play!  Phew!

    (Denise) My mom was a housewife from the time she married but wasn’t hooked on soap operas — until I got her hooked on them!  I began watching “Love of Life” one summer as a child and begged her to watch it for me when I had to return back to school. Every time I came home I got a full report on that day’s episode. After that, she became more interested in soaps and watched various programs.

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  14. Agreed, rascal!

    Personally I think that whenever possible, both mothers and fathers should give themselves a grace period to figure things out before deciding how they would “like to” proceed as parents. You just don’t know how it will be for you. My mother loved her job and always expected that she would want to go back, but once she had my older sister, she hated working. She hated it so much that she eventually went on a speaking-strike and didn’t talk to my dad for almost two weeks, until he agreed to find a way to make things work so that she could stay at home. (She ended up getting together with a friend who lived on their block in Brooklyn, and together watching all the neighborhood kids as well as their own, and earning a bit of money that way. Side bonus: we had a whole neighborhood’s worth of toys).

    My aunt, on the other hand, stayed home with her baby for a year and went stir-crazy. Her husband and her parents both threw a fit and tried to dissuade her, but eventually she got a part-time job and felt that the small time spent away from home, interacting with adults in adult situations, made her a better and calmer mother overall. 

    I don’t really care whether women stay home with a child or go back to work – but I do get kind of irked by people who think that you can just say, “This is what I will do,” and have it work out that way. Your whole life is about to radically change – what say you give that a few weeks to settle in before making any big lifestyle pronouncements? 

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  15. @ Alexandria: You aunt didn’t “go stir-crazy” because she didn’t work at a paid job. She suffered psychologically because she was isolated all day with her baby. 
    Mothers today have 2 basic choices: 1) To be isolated with a baby the entire day.
    2) To leave the baby with someone else through much of the day.
    Both of these are against women’s psychic “nature.” Women often suffer in the absence of adult company. Like men, even slightly more than men, women have a natural desire for the stimulation of interacting with other people, including other adults. In this respect, being a stay-at-home-mom makes less sense than being a stay-at-home-dad!
    Women carry and give birth. After the birth, their bodies are prepared to nourish their young. (The strength of this biological connection is why placing a baby for adoption can be so terribly traumatic for both the mother and the baby.) Thus, they naturally crave contact and interaction with the baby. Having to work a paid job may cause them distress for this reason because it takes them away from the child. 
    While being a stay-at-home-mom is often preferred by women, it leaves them in an extremely precarious position. A person’s labor market value declines with absence from the labor market. Thus, if a marriage breaks up, a stay-at-home-mom can find herself economically crushed. This makes it vital to put in economic protections for full-time homemakers (including men who take this role). Alimony is one such protection but is no longer common. It should be revived IMO. Conservative columnist George F. Will has suggested something similar to the G.I. Bill for stay-at-home-moms (and SAHDs).
    Anyway, my basic point is that neither being isolated with a baby the whole day nor being separated from a baby all day is really optimal for women.  I don’t have a magic wand but think it’s important to realize this truth.

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  16. That is why I do not like the term “stay-at-home” mom – it sounds isolating. Mom’s who don’t work don’t have to literally stay at home with the kids. We were made to be vital parts of communities, inside and outside of the family structure. It’s not always easy to get out with the wee ones, but it’s not usually easy to stay home either.

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  17. LifeJoy says:
    July 19, 2012 at 11:27 pm
    That is why I do not like the term “stay-at-home” mom – it sounds isolating. Mom’s who don’t work don’t have to literally stay at home with the kids. We were made to be vital parts of communities, inside and outside of the family structure. It’s not always easy to get out with the wee ones, but it’s not usually easy to stay home either.

    (Denise) If there’s one term I really hate, it is “Moms who don’t work.”  Could we please change this to the lengthier but far more accurate — and less demeaning — moms who do not work in the paid labor market?  Being outside the paid labor market doesn’t imply that someone does no “work.”  Work includes changing diapers, giving feedings, bathing, etc.  Work includes mowing a lawn, cooking a meal, doing the laundry, repairing household items that are broken, and cleaning a room. People of both sexes do a great deal of “work” that is outside the paid labor market.

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  18. The whole controversy surrounding upper-class women leaving their kids with someone else part of the time is somewhat phony. Throughout history, affluent moms have often paid a supervisory role in their children’s lives, often leaving them with other females (nannies and governesses). What is new is that the affluent moms are at jobs where they earn money rather than at leisure or social activities.

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