I don’t do abortions, I’ll tell you right now. … But I’d have to tell the mother, ‘Your baby doesn’t have a chance and to save your life, I have to do this.’

~ Dr. John Coppes, medical director at Austin Medical Center-Mayo Health System in Minnesota, stating his opinion regarding the recent controversial death of Savita Halappanavar (pictured right) in Ireland, CBS News, November 15

The hospital’s refusal to perform an abortion as she was miscarrying allegedly contributed to her death, according to her husband and pro-abortion activists.

The other side of the story, from World magazine, November 16:

Pro-abortion advocates are clamoring for Ireland to change its abortion laws after 31-year-old Savita Halappanavar died after a miscarriage. Doctors had refused to abort her 17-week-old unborn baby because the child had a heartbeat.

While the investigation is still ongoing about what exactly happened to Halappanavar, media and others in Ireland are placing the blame on the country’s pro-life laws that have made abortion illegal – except when the life of the mother is in danger – for the past 20 years.

But some point out that this case had little to do with the pro-life laws, but rather with irresponsible medical protocol.

Halappanavar visited Galway University Hospital on Oct. 21 because she was suffering back pain. Doctors said she was having a miscarriage, and when she asked for an abortion, the doctors said refused because the unborn baby had a heartbeat. Halappanavar died three days later of a septicemia infection.

Eilís Mulroy wrote in an opinion piece in the UK’s Independent, “In this kind of situation the baby can be induced early (though is very unlikely to survive). The decision to induce labor early would be fully in compliance with the law and the current guidelines set out for doctors by the Irish Medical Council.”

The Irish law did not stop the doctors from saving Halappanavar, Mulroy wrote, and so the responsibility of Halappanavar’s death is on the medical team for not practicing the right protocol….

Ireland, according to the United Nations, is one of the safest places for a mother to have a baby.