Pro-life blog buzz 11-9-12

by Kelli

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  • Wesley J. Smith discusses the reasons why he believes assisted suicide proponents lost their bid to legalize the practice in Massachusetts.
  • Michael New says that despite an anti-life win in the Presidential race, other life issues ballot initiatives fared well on Election Day.

    At First Things, New also argues that the greatest successes of pro-lifers over the past 20 years have been outside the political realm, as evidenced by the declining abortion rate.

  • ProLife NZ has an excellent and lengthy response to a viral blog post about one woman’s (as usual) illogical journey from pro-life to pro-choice, pointing out that apologetics are crucial in the pro-life fight.
  • At Pro-Life Action League, Joe Scheidler says pro-lifers need to “shake off the nightmare” of the election and get back to our mission: saving children’s lives and helping women.

  • Secular Pro-Life explains how pro-lifers should respond to the “70% of pro-lifers are men, and 100% will never be pregnant” myth, and other ad hominem attacks:

    It’s also important to keep in mind that Roe v. Wade was decided on by nine men. If men must stay out of the abortion issue, we must keep them out of the issue on both sides. So we would have to overturn Roe v. Wade. But that’s not all. If your contention is that men must stay out because they have never been pregnant so they can’t understand what it’s like, would you say that women who have never been pregnant should stay out, too? “Well,” you might say, “women can at least get pregnant. Men should stay out because they can never get pregnant.” Then would you also say that women who are incapable of becoming pregnant should also stay out of the abortion issue?

    Should white people who have never owned slaves, never had the means to own slaves, or were never slaves themselves, have stayed out of the slavery issue? Were non-Jews wrong for opposing the Holocaust? Abortion is a human rights issue, just like slavery and the Holocaust were.

    Standing against injustice is right for everyone, not simply someone of a particular gender, race, religion, and so on.

  • Reggie Littlejohn of Women’s Rights Without Frontiers is doing her part to educate Europe on the horrors of gendercide by co-presenting the film, It’s a Girl, to both the British and European Parliaments.
  • ProWomanProLife posts an article excerpt by George Jonas, who reportedly “does not associate himself with the pro-life movement.” The whole article is worth a read:

    In our times feminists contend that social equality is a compelling reason [for abortion]. They interpret it as women having no burdens imposed on them that aren’t also imposed on men. Since nature imposes pregnancy only on women, in order to even the scales, women should be entitled to an absolute license to terminate their pregnancies on demand.

    This is the essence of the feminist argument, though it’s seldom put so bluntly…. They can’t quite bring themselves to grant women a licence to kill, like 007. This is why the debate is filled with pious rhetoric about women controlling their own bodies, or lives aborted not being “life.”

  • At the Priests for Life blog, Fr. Frank Pavone shares words of post-election encouragement:

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8 thoughts on “Pro-life blog buzz 11-9-12”

  1. Men wrote the laws against forcible rape. They wrote the laws against child molestation. They wrote the laws against statutory rape.

    The inventors of the Pill and other effective contraceptives were men.

    However, it remains true that as a gender, men tend to be the ones seeking the sort of sex that leads to pregnancy. They could, as a gender, work to make abortion less common if more would reject the “men’s culture” that views as admirable male promiscuity. 

    In a limited but real sense partnered sex can be viewed as “men’s play and women’s pay.” There is a valid point in that men as a gender are to some extent the primary force behind pregnancies that cause girls and women to be in “crisis.” 

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  2. That 77% of anti-abortion leaders are men ad does have a legitimate point. How one stands on this issue may reflect identification.  Do you identify with the embryo or fetus that will be expelled at the cost of life?  Or do you identify with the unwillingly pregnant woman who does not want to continue carrying?  

    Social conservative Caitlan Flanagan has written, “My very nature as a woman pulls me in both directions.” She has never had an abortion and never will. I’ve never had an abortion and never will.  But it is still easier for either of us to identify with the girl or woman who does not want to continue carrying a pregnancy that it is for a man to identify with a female who does not want to continue carrying.  

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  3. “But it is still easier for either of us to identify with the girl or woman who does not want to continue carrying a pregnancy that it is for a man to identify with a female who does not want to continue carrying. ”

    It is precisely because I am a woman who has had a baby in my belly three times that I cannot relate very easily to women who want to abort. I can sympathize with their circumstances, but I would be more likely to be pro-choice if I were a man.

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  4. While I support the idea of assisted suicide in theory, the potential for abuse is pretty scary, especially against the most vulnerable, obviously.
     
    I’m fine with deciding for myself, though, while I’m coherent, just what I’d be willing to tolerate should I develop dementia or some other condition that puts me in a long-term health-care facility. My 2 criteria here are waste of health-care money (public or private) keeping me alive when it could be much better spent helping someone else, as well as how I’d like my friends and family to remember me.
     
    There are some interesting resources out there that allow you to state what sort of life-saving actions you’d like to have performed on you should you suffer a health crisis. You can specify at what levels of health you would like to have these performed. For example, if you have already suffered a severe stroke and should then suffer another one, do you want medical personnel to attempt to perform CPR, etc.?
     
    I’m not sure how that fits in to various religious or political beliefs (say, being opposed to socialized health care), but many of the choices are passive and don’t involve medical personnel actually pulling any plugs, so to speak.
     
    Not many people want to consider their eventual demise, but the important thing is that your family/health-care proxy know what you want and are okay with carrying it out. Whether you want every attempt made to sustain you, or have life-saving medication withheld after you’ve suffered from a stroke, the important thing is to have your loved ones know. There are far too many terrible stories about people who haven’t specified this and then have to have others duke it out or go against your wishes should you become incapacitated.

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  5. “I’m not sure how that fits in to various religious or political beliefs (say, being opposed to socialized health care), but many of the choices are passive and don’t involve medical personnel actually pulling any plugs, so to speak.”

    Pretty sure the DNRs, orders to Do Not Resuscitate, and such are standard and not at stake in discussions of assisted suicide, because as you said, they are passive and involve withholding potentially lifesaving care, not directly causing a living person to die. (They tried to get my grandma to sign one in her last month). A healthcare person would certainly know much more than I do.

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  6. That 77% of anti-abortion leaders are men ad does have a legitimate point.

    No, it really doesn’t. And if you read the article referenced, you’ll see why.

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  7. Many years ago I discussed the case of “surrogate mother” Mary Beth Whitehead who had changed her mind and wanted to raise the baby with two women. One woman said, “I think the kid will be mad at the father because she will think, ‘My mother wanted to raise me and you didn’t let her.'”
    I pointed out, “He’s genetically as much the father as she is the mother.”
    The woman looked at me with a startled gaze. The other woman explained, “He didn’t carry it. He didn’t give birth to it.”
    Discussing this case, a letter writer — who was a man — asked, “Are we to believe an overwhelming paternal bond is created by masturbating into a little cup?”
    Another writer said of someone who compared selling sperm to “surrogate motherhood” that “masturbating into a little cup is not at all like having a baby.”
    Men are farther away from the physical facts of pregnancy so they may tend to view it in more abstract terms. 

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