10299863_643046945782168_2130286851_nThe narratives most often used to spread reproductive justice awareness always center the discussion on “Women’s Rights.” But since I’m not a woman, I’ve felt very disconnected from the spaces I work in….

I was twenty when I had a medicinal abortion, and I have been on some form of birth control since that time. Even though the ability to reproduce hasn’t always been a factor with the partners I have had, I like knowing that I have a back-up plan and hormonal regularity….

Even the intake forms at my local Planned Parenthood are incredibly trans-exclusive! When I went to Planned Parenthood to get birth control I wasn’t given the option to state my preferred name or personal pronouns….

You might love your new hashtag or slogan, and it might be pretty catchy, but take a moment to remember that the “War on Women” really only means one type of person: cis-women.

“A Woman’s Right to Choose,” “Women’s Health,” and “Women’s Access” are all phrases that erase me and others like me.

Using “women” as a catch-all term for “people with active uteruses” is incredibly problematic….

Remember basic diversity training…. Not everyone who gives birth identifies as a woman…

Don’t assume that because someone is feminine that they are a woman regardless of their assigned reproductive system….

If you aren’t catching my obvious personal feelings, I’ll make clear that I’m a femme nonbinary person who deals with this all the time. Make my life a little easier. C’mon.

~ Jack Qu’emi, “4 ways to be gender inclusive when discussing abortion,” everydayfeminism.com, August 29

JLS note: My hope is commenters won’t mock Jack. My goal in posting this is to shed light to pro-lifers on another element of confusion and lostness on the other side. What would you say to Jack if having coffee together?

[HT: @LivinOnAClaire on Twitter]; photo of Jack via ink361.com]