Weekend question 3/6-7/10

A question posed on Affiliate Referral Sources, March 5...

Jesuit, Planned Parenthood, abortion.png

Details...

... I'm trying to get into a nursing program this fall, and some of the schools I've looked up and seriously considering applying for are Catholic (Jesuit) affiliated. Of course, this doesn't mean I'm going to be taking classes in Eucharistology instead of clinical rotations, but I was wondering how that affiliation would matter in admissions purposes.

For me to get some pre-nursing experience, I only have 3 routes: Work in a hospital, a nursing home, or Planned Parenthood. I've already applied to some hospital jobs, but I know there's some job openings at the Houston PP. Would that hurt my application if I worked there? Well, I'm not squeamish (if I were, I wouldn't be trying to get a nursing degree!). Also, I'm pretty pro-Choice, so it's no big deal for me either.

Interesting that comments to that post are closed. But they're open here. Thoughts?

[HT: Susie Allen]


Comments:

Well, considering my Catholic university allows students to intern at PP, my response would be that it probably wouldn't matter.

Of course, it depends on the school.

Posted by: Lauren at March 6, 2010 9:11 AM


two interesting points....no three,
openings seem to be at PP as in who would want to work there...
she doesn't say she is Catholic maybe trying to get into a Catholic school due to quality of education...
and she is not squeamish....better not be because she will see some awful things at PP

Posted by: Susie Allen at March 6, 2010 9:13 AM


Unfortunately I think it depends on the school. I do not see Franciscan University accepting that application but ND would probably have no problem.

Posted by: Kristen at March 6, 2010 9:15 AM


Oh Lauren, what school is that???

Posted by: Susie Allen at March 6, 2010 9:15 AM


You know another thing is whenever PP speaks before the legislature they make it a point to have someone there who says I have a degree in Divinity.

Posted by: Susie Allen at March 6, 2010 9:23 AM


St. Edward's in Austin.

The "joke" is that the only thing that makes them Catholic is the rosaries in the gift shop.

Sadly, it's not far from the truth. That said, when I applied I talked very much about wanting to go to a school that valued life and that wasn't a problem for me getting in, so at least there's that...

Posted by: Lauren at March 6, 2010 9:25 AM


I just finished applying for jobs at Colleges and Universities across the US, many of which are Jesuit institutions. I'd say i applied to about 10 of the, what 28, Jesuit schools in the US. I have to say that nothing on their websites, nothing about their own description of their school leads me to believe that they would have the slightest problem with someone who interned at PP. Really very sad.

Posted by: Bobby Bambino Author Profile Page at March 6, 2010 9:26 AM


Kristen,

Though there was this horrible scandal with Obama last year, I think there is a very strong group of faithful at ND. I have heard that when you enter campus, it just REEKS Catholicism. That is much more than I can say for some of the Catholic schools I have visited recently. My guess is that even though there are some bad spots with ND, I still hold out hope that they would have a problem with someone interning at PP. Sadly, I could be wrong, though. God love you.

Posted by: Bobby Bambino Author Profile Page at March 6, 2010 9:29 AM


It should affect her admission to a Catholic or Jesuit university, but unfortunately, it probably won't. Notre Dame would welcome her with a parade, as would Georgetown. I'm expecting Cecile Richards to be their speaker for graduation.

Posted by: Jennifer at March 6, 2010 9:31 AM


You can also work in home care. Prior to nursing school, I worked as a nursing assistant in a hospital, nursing homes, and a few years doing hospice home care.

I don't think you will get very good clinical experience working at a planned parenthood. I'm not sure what type of work you would be qualified for at a PP.

You would get a much more diverse clinical experience working in a hospital, nursing home, or home care setting. These experiences would better prepare you for what you will have to deal with in nursing school.

Best of luck.

Posted by: psalm at March 6, 2010 9:34 AM


As far as Georgetown goes, I agree with Jennifer that the school which has an endowed chair named after Robert Drinan would have no problem with this. Hey, I guess that goes for BC as well!

Posted by: Bobby Bambino Author Profile Page at March 6, 2010 9:50 AM


Since I personally would support Planned Parenthood if it weren't for the fact that they go out of their way to support abortion (I mean really out of their way), I would say that it shouldn't matter. This is simply because she probably wasn't doing anything but taking calls and handing out birth control.

Posted by: Vannah at March 6, 2010 9:58 AM


It really struck me that she stated that she is applying to nursing school but then said she wasn't "squeamish" about working at planned parenthood. Obviously one would assume if you are pursuing a career in the medical field you must not be squeamish so why would she even say that? Or did she feel that she had to clarify because it was Planned Parenthood she was talking about. I mean, what would-be nurse would say "I'm working in this ambulatory care center but i'm not squeamish" or "I'm working in this surgi-center but I'm not squeamish" or "I'm going to work at this geriatric center but I'm not squeamish"...no one who was pursuing nursing would ever use those words in relation to NORMAL medical settings so the fact that she equates "squeamish" with what would happen at a Planned Parenthood is really intersting to me.

Posted by: Sydney M. at March 6, 2010 10:16 AM


Good point, Sydney. We all know that hospital work is going to involve some blood and guts and other bodily fluids. No need to make a special point about it unless she knows there's something else going on at PP that might make a person "sqeamish" namely the dismembering of unborn children.

Posted by: Lauren at March 6, 2010 10:18 AM


I bet working at a PP will be quite an education. Just not necessarily quite the education she's hoping for.

Posted by: Christina at March 6, 2010 12:46 PM


Me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me,me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me........the mantra of the pro-chice movement.

Posted by: Phil Schembri is HisMan at March 6, 2010 1:36 PM


Well now Phil, wait a minute! Thats not entirely fair!

You forgot I, I , I , I ...then its me me me me me me me me me and then sometimes its more I, I , I.

Posted by: Sydney M. at March 6, 2010 1:41 PM


She's pretty much pro-choice, says no big deal. It amazes me how thinking has changed since I was in school. The problem is, we're going backwards, not forward. Plate and Aristotle recommended infanticide as legislative state policy. Christianity changed the game.

I would recommend she work in a hospital. You learn so much, may even get your foot in the door to a nursing program.

Posted by: Mary at March 6, 2010 2:26 PM


Actually, I'm taking a CNA (certified nursing assistant) or nurse aide certification course right now and one of the things they told us on the first day of class is that when most people think of CNAs or nurse aids, they think of CNAs working in nursing homes, but CNAs are hired in a number of different areas across the health field, including as home health aides, in nursing homes, in hospice care, in hospitals (as patient care technicians), dialysis centers, physicians offices, etc and so this woman has more options than she realizes.

Posted by: Rachael C. at March 6, 2010 2:47 PM


Also, I forgot to add that many individuals get their CNA certification for pre-nursing school exprience, before going for their LPN or RN. The CNA certification in an 6 to 8 week course, teaching the fundimentals of nursing with lecture, lab, and clinical hours, and the course is offered through nursing homes, career centers, community colleges, and vocational/tech schools. This would be a great way for her to get some pre-nursing, profesional experience in variety of health care settings and professional references for nursing school.

Posted by: Rachael C. at March 6, 2010 2:57 PM


We all seem to be overlooking the proverbial "elephant in the living room". This prospective nursing student is going into a healing profession, yet has no bones stating his/her indifference to the slaughter of babies. Nursing programs are the least of his/her problems, as his/her head is screwed on backwards.

Posted by: Janet Baker at March 6, 2010 3:07 PM


Janet, I agree with you totally. Nursing is about healing and comforting. Nursing is not about the active pursuit of killing other human beings. If anyone wants to do that there are plenty of gangs in NY and LA who do just that. You really don't need an education to kill people. An education would only allow someone to "safely" kill people.

Posted by: segamon at March 6, 2010 5:30 PM


As a nurse, I will say, you won't get the experience you truly need working in a PP. It will not prepare you whatsoever for real nursing.

Try a nursing home or a hospital. The jobs are MUCH harder work, but at least you'll go into nursing school with an understanding of the job.

Posted by: Elisabeth at March 6, 2010 5:52 PM


The Cardinal Newman Society published a guide to Catholic Colleges:

http://thenewmanguide.com/

They set a variety of criteria for what constitutes a genuinely Catholic college or university.Not one of the Jesuit schools made the list. Not even close.

That should be taken as a direction by the applicant.

As my wife has often said, Nurse isn't just a noun, it's also a vern. It's what she does.

Killing babies doesn't fit that formula.

Posted by: Gerard Nadal at March 6, 2010 6:41 PM


Posted by: Bobby Bambino at March 6, 2010 9:29 AM

Hi Bobby,

I have a BIL that went to ND and I have been to the school often. Really I have not noticed anything reeking Catholicism when I have been there and, although my hubby is very devote and his parents are as well, my BIL is very liberal. I guess I cannot say it is all ND fault but they did play a part.

Posted by: Kristen at March 6, 2010 9:03 PM


I would sure hope so but I doubt it.

Posted by: Wendy at March 6, 2010 9:14 PM


I concur with Elizabeth that planned parenthood would not be a good site for gaining broad exposure to nursing practice. Work at planned parenthood is very routine, and it turfs all the sick or complex patients, (or botched patients) to the nearest hospital. It's an assembly line sort of practice.

A couple of other points......

Why do "prochoice" health care practitioners seek to work at places where they won't have to do abortions???? Ever wonder that?

Why don't they go to those places that would expect their participation in the practice, and leave the jobs at religious institutions to those who can't participate in abortion?

Answer -- because abortion practice eventually makes anyone sick.

Planned parenthood, and other facilities of its kind are viewed by most health care practitioners as the dumpster of medicine. Experience at a planned parenthood will not be viewed as a gold star on the resume to any employers except the rare, extreme leftist ideologues.

Posted by: Pharmer at March 6, 2010 11:19 PM


having PP on you resume my be a plus if you apply to a Jesuit nursing school, although, it may give you trouble applying to a public school..

Posted by: Jasper at March 6, 2010 11:28 PM


That should have read, "Nurse is also a verB"

Posted by: Gerard Nadal at March 7, 2010 12:05 AM


The Jesuits are logical people - the most rational Catholics, IMO, as I was Jesuit educated (little did they know nor care that I was not a Catholic). They shouldn't pass any judgement whatsoever over an applicant's stint at PP. For them to assume that the applicant was, at best, distributing condoms, and at worst, referring patients to clinics and hospitals for terminations, would be a double-whammy. There's no way the applicant would be directly involved with termination.

And a public nursing school would not care, either.

And by the way, ER nurses are asked to help manage miscarriages and 'bleeders' all the time. They have every moral right to opt out of the case. But to assume that 'real nurses' don't participate in pregnancy terminations is nonsense. A few do, especially in the ER where pregnancies are lost for time to time.

Posted by: Dhalgren at March 7, 2010 3:17 PM


Why do "prochoice" health care practitioners seek to work at places where they won't have to do abortions???? Ever wonder that?

To actually be a provider is a commitment I would compare to the military or CIA. Every new provider graduating from fellow to attending this summer is a young woman, roughly 32 years old. From UCLA Medical, to Jackson Memorial, to New York Presbyterian, to Bringham & Women's, there are practitioners who go the full distance and commit themselves to 30 years of service providing 1st and 2nd trimester terminations. And their courage will never be questioned.

Posted by: Dhalgren at March 7, 2010 3:26 PM


Cowards abort babies. Those with courage DON'T ABORT BABIES or harm the mothers.

Posted by: LizFromNebraska at March 7, 2010 3:29 PM


Posted by: Dhalgren at March 7, 2010 3:26PM

..."there are practitioners who go the full distance and commit themselves to 30 years of service providing 1st and 2nd trimester terminations.

And their courage will never be questioned.

--------------------------------------------------

Dolly,

Courage?!?

What 'courage' is required to take candy from a baby not with the government only protecting the thief, but paying him/her to do so?

'Arm the Human Fetuses'

Nothing would give me more satisfaction than witnessing the gratuitious violence of a abortion with currette in hand going in for the kill and recoiling in horror with nothing but a bloody stump where his hand used to be.

I would pay to see that sort of irony.

Please allow me my Walter Mitty moment.

Aborionist are not courageous, they are just highly educated and highly compensated bullies.

yor bro ken

Posted by: kbhvac at March 7, 2010 5:53 PM


"Would having a Planned Parenthood in my resumé affect admission to Catholic (Jesuit)affiliated nursing schools?"

Based on my observations I would have to say that having PP in your resumé would definately 'affect' your prosepects of being admitted to a Catholic (Jesuit) nursing school,

but not in the way you might expect.

I believe it would 'enhance' your likelihood of being accepted at almost any nursing school that is affiliated with a mainstream Christian denomination.

yor bro ken

yor bro ken

Posted by: kbhvac at March 7, 2010 6:02 PM


Dhalgren, as an EMERGENCY ROOM PEDIATRIC NURSE (and yes, we deal with miscarriages, too)... please do not attempt to insinuate that assisting a woman having a miscarriage has ANY resemblance to providing abortion services.

You have no right to speak of the work that I do and that other fine nurses do, day and night, week after week, year after year. You have no clue, no moral compass and you do NOT speak for any nurse I have ever known or worked with.

Posted by: Elisabeth at March 7, 2010 6:51 PM


OK, Someone help me out and tell me what Dalgren's reply had to do with the portion of my post that he quoted before his own text.
I figured it to be a "word salad" of sorts, or perhaps it is a pavlovian reflexive spew of memorized propaganda.

Maybe another reader has more insight on the connection.
;-)

Posted by: Pharmer at March 7, 2010 8:14 PM


"The Jesuits are logical people - the most rational Catholics, IMO, as I was Jesuit educated (little did they know nor care that I was not a Catholic). They shouldn't pass any judgement whatsoever over an applicant's stint at PP."

There's proof right there...

Posted by: Jasper at March 7, 2010 9:29 PM



"To actually be a provider is a commitment I would compare to the military or CIA. Every new provider graduating from fellow to attending this summer is a young woman, roughly 32 years old. From UCLA Medical, to Jackson Memorial, to New York Presbyterian, to Bringham & Women's, there are practitioners who go the full distance and commit themselves to 30 years of service providing 1st and 2nd trimester terminations. And their courage will never be questioned."

Posted by: Dhalgren at March 7, 2010 3:26 PM

Are these the top abortion-providing hospitals in the US?

Posted by: Janet at March 8, 2010 12:03 PM


Those women are not courageous. Courage is standing up to the pro-abortion mindset that permiates many OB/GYN programs and standing for life. Those women are the worst kind of coward.

Posted by: Lauren at March 8, 2010 4:45 PM


Are these the top abortion-providing hospitals in the US?

I would say so. All of these hospitals have full-service family planning divisions, and are the best of the best. Add to that list Johns Hopkins and UNC Chapel Hill and you have a more complete list. The University of Utah has just established a family planning division in Salt Lake, and Parkland (Dallas) should do it sometime next decade.

Posted by: Dhalgren at March 9, 2010 1:45 PM


Dhalgren, as an EMERGENCY ROOM PEDIATRIC NURSE (and yes, we deal with miscarriages, too)... please do not attempt to insinuate that assisting a woman having a miscarriage has ANY resemblance to providing abortion services.

I am only speaking from experience. I have heard of ER nurses recusing themselves from miscarriage cases on the grounds that the procedure is very similar to a D&E. Both the management of a miscarriage and a 2nd trimester abortion involve the dilution of the cervix / induced labor.

Or put another way, I have heard nurses ask the attending to confirm that the patient is experiencing a miscarriage, and not an abortion, and then making a judgement call from there.

The point I was trying to make was that the argument that abortion is somehow not 'real' medical care is full of holes. Abortion is an induced miscarriage. So anyone who can manage a miscarriage can also manage a termination. Same skills, and almost the same medicine.

Posted by: Dhalgren at March 9, 2010 1:56 PM


"Abortion is an induced miscarriage."

LOL Nice try, Dhalgren.

Abortion is the intentional killing of a growing child. The abortionist kills the child.

A miscarriage is when a child dies naturally. The body of that child may or may not need to be removed.

I guess you might want to talk to the prolife nurses around here that would REFUSE to use their skills and knowledge of medicine to assist in the intentional killing of a child in an abortion.

Posted by: carla Author Profile Page at March 9, 2010 7:23 PM


"family planning", "family planning", "family planning"...

I thought the legalized abortion advocates were supposed to be getting away from euphemisms?

Posted by: xalisae at March 9, 2010 8:51 PM