Tag Archives: family planning

Sunday Word: “A large population is a king’s glory, but a shortage of people is a ruler’s ruin”

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A large population is a king’s glory, but a shortage of people is a ruler’s ruin.

~ Proverbs 14:28, International Standard Version, a thought Christian singer Amy Grant might bear in mind as she determines to team up with the pro-abortion, pro-contraception Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to promote “family planning” around the world

Pro-life blog buzz 1-30-15

pro-lifeby Susie Allen, host of the blog, Pro-Life in TN, and Kelli

  • Live Action News reports on a perfect example of twisted pro-abortion logic from The Abortion Resource Handbook, in which author K Kaufmann tells teens that keeping their pregnancy and abortion a secret is positive and shows signs of maturity. (That’s interesting – I always thought hiding things from people was more a sign of an immature person with an inability to deal with the consequences of one’s own actions):

    However sad or angry you feel right now, keep in mind that not involving a parent is often a sign of maturity – that you are able to make and take responsibility for your own decisions. Keeping the pregnancy and abortion a secret may even turn out to be a positive experience. For many young women, it may be one of the first times they make an important or life-changing decision on their own, and they may feel more confident and better about themselves as a result.One of the first life-changing decisions… secondary, of course, to the decision to have sex in the first place.

  • Abstinence Clearinghouse reports on a Danish study which reveals a possible link between hormonal birth control use and brain tumors:

    The study examined 316 women with glioma and found that women who used contraceptives containing only progestin for more than five years had a risk that was 2.4 times higher than the control group.

  • Wesley J. Smith shares his 2015 bioethics predictions. Check out how he did on his predictions from last year.

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  • Bound4Life gives an overview of important court cases in the pro-life movement:

    Over the past seven weeks, three separate federal appeals courts have heard important cases related to abortion policy in America — all with far-reaching implications for pre-born lives.

  • Pro-Life Wisconsin reports that Republicans legislators are conducting an audit on Planned Parenthood who has “publicly stated that if they are audited, they will likely have to close their birth control clinics in the state”:

    Pro-Life Wisconsin applauds this bold legislative effort to root out waste, fraud and abuse in Wisconsin’s Medicaid family planning program. It is bad enough that these family planning monies fuel surgical and chemical abortions in our state. It is intolerable that Wisconsin taxpayers are ripped off in the process!

  • After Abortion refers to a survey showing 49% believe abortion is immoral, yet 51% want to keep it legal anyway. How about that for compartmentalization? Could this be due to society’s widespread misunderstanding of “judging” the actions of others, or could it be that they want it around in case they decide to do the immoral thing?
  • At National Review, Dr. Michael J. New writes that NARAL must be getting desperate, because they’re now conducting their own polls on Americans’ views on abortion:

    [T]he poll, which purports to show strong support for legal abortion in four congressional districts, is deceptive. That NARAL increasingly feels the need to conduct its own polls at all is a striking shift in and of itself. But it’s the change in the questions those polls ask that should really raise eyebrows….The alternatives were 1) abortion is morally acceptable and should be legal; 2) personally opposed to abortion, but it should remain legal; and 3) abortion should be illegal.

    A plurality of respondents preferred the second option, and NARAL quickly announced that the first and second options combined commanded majority support. Of course, the three questions did not allow for much nuance. Specifically, the poll did not ask about the 20-week abortion ban or other incremental pro-life laws that tend to poll well.

Attempt to hide abortion behind contraception an epic fail

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In a November 26 Washington Post essay, political scientists John McTague and Melissa Deckman reported news of epic proportions to pro-lifers while dissecting why the “war on women” meme bombed in the 2014 Midterms:

Democratic campaigns mistakenly conflated abortion and government-mandated insurance coverage for birth control, even though voters view these two issues through different lenses. In short, Democrats fundamentally misunderstood why there is a gender gap in American politics in the first place.

Attitudes about the size and scope of government – not abortion – are what drive the gender gap. Women are more likely than men to believe that the federal government should provide assistance to the poor, in part because women are disproportionately likely to be recipients of such government aid.

However, as the Udall ad… illustrates, the rhetoric of the “war on women” often fuses the separate issues of insurance coverage for birth control with abortion rights, treating both as “culture war” issues, and this is not how most voters perceive the issue.

As our research shows, attitudes about abortion and attitudes about government-mandated insurance coverage for birth control are not strongly related. Americans view abortion largely as an issue of personal morality, akin to other “culture war” issues, such as gay rights and marijuana. By contrast, insurance coverage for birth control taps into attitudes about economic opportunity and the proper size and scope of government.

This news is big because it strikes at the very strategy abortion proponents were pinning their hopes on to entice both women and Millennials, key demographic groups whose support of abortion is flailing, as noted by pro-abortion Sarah Kliff at WaPo in 2012 (and NARAL back in 2010):

[T]he White House sees… a chance to widen the reproductive health debate beyond abortion to issues like contraceptives, winning over key demographics of independent voters in the process… young voters and women…

These voters have tended to be difficult for abortion rights supporters to engage on reproductive health issues like abortion. Research from NARAL Pro-Choice America, which I wrote about last weekend, found a significant “intensity gap” there, with abortion rights supporters much less likely to see it as a crucial voting issue than their anti-abortion counterparts.

But when the conversation moves away from abortion to contraceptives… the intensity gap flips: A much larger segment of voters are willing to penalize a legislator who votes to defund family planning.

Hence, the entire “war on women” strategy, which clearly flopped last month. McTague and Deckman weren’t sure it was ever a success.

NARAL_logo2The important take-away is abortion proponents thought they found a winning issue – contraception – to leech the losing issue of abortion to, but they were wrong.

Both Millennials and women still separate the two in their minds – even after being pounded by millions of dollars of advertising – deeming abortion a moral issue they’re not necessarily crazy about and contraception an economic issue they’re not necessarily flocking to the polls to support.

Not that I don’t think the other side will think of a new strategy, but they’re still losing, and everyone knows it. For example, a few recent articles by abortion supporters: “It’s not just Hobby Lobby: the pro-life movement is winning,” “Ten reasons women are losing while gays keep winning,” Pro-life movement winning the battle over abortion, birth control accessibility.”

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Feminist thinks “The Giver” is a slam to pro-lifers

The-Giver-Movieby Kelli

On one hand, the depiction of “release to elsewhere” – especially of one of the unqualified babies, who is given a lethal injection and then dropped down a chute — could surely be used as grist for organizations who are deemed pro-life. (Especially given that in real life, abortion foes often use jarring images of fetuses to further their claim that abortion is murder, despite the fact that such images misrepresent the reality of abortion.)

On the other hand, the suggestion that birth control and family planning are necessary in a world of limited resources are in keeping with pro-choice sentiments. Further, the focus on “unqualified” babies who are at least several months old – not on embryos, fetuses, or zygotes (what those on the “pro-life” side often call “life”) – indicates that this “release” is NOT the same thing as abortion. (Thus, the story is much different from the one told by the likes of Rand Paul — the horror at ending a life is not focused on the contents of a pregnant woman’s uterus, but on a functioning, breathing, fully formed human baby.)

That the images of “release to elsewhere” are juxtaposed with murderous images – the slaughter of elephants, the killing of innocents by military forces – could be interpreted as furthering the pro-life claim that the taking of “life” is murder. However, the suggestion that murder of the past (war, genocide, etc) has been supplanted with a different kind of murder which is no better emphasizes the hypocrisy at the heart of the pro-life stance: that those who condemn abortion as “murder” also call for the killing of abortion providers and/or support war, resist gun control, and fail to condemn genocide. The quote the current receiver says to Jonas about murder not being eliminated just renamed is applicable here: Pro-lifers do not eliminate what they call murder (abortion and contraception); rather, they call reproductive choice “murderous” and name what they do (such as killing providers like Dr. Tiller) as protecting innocent lives. In doing so, however, they perpetuate the lack of choice that perpetuates so many of the murdering forces in our society: poverty, criminalization, the military machine.

~ Natalie Wilson, reviewing the dystopian movie The Giver, Ms. Magazine Blog, August 18

[Photo by Entertainment Weekly via disneydreaming.com]

Pro-life blog buzz 8-1-14

pro-lifeby Susie Allen, host of the blog, Pro-Life in TN, and Kelli

  • Suzy B links to an article in the New York Times discussing their efforts to teach politicians and pro-lifers in the public eye how to frame discussions on abortion and life issues.

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  • ProLifeBlogs features Operation Rescue’s post regarding Planned Parenthood of St. Louis’ choice to make ambulance calls to a private service (despite slower response time than 911) in order to prevent pro-lifers from obtaining 911 call information under the Freedom of Information Act. Prior to this, Operation Rescue had been given a heavily redacted report of a PP ambulance call from the St. Louis Fire Department, which resulted in OR filing a lawsuit. Planned Parenthood’s decision puts the safety of women second to protecting their own supposedly “safe” image, as this particular clinic has had 26 known incidents in the past five years.
  • At National Review, Michael J. New discusses the decision of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals to strike down a Mississippi admitting privileges law, pointing out the court’s odd reasoning and asking if the sole abortion clinic in MS could ever be closed based on their reasoning, even for health and safety violations:

    The oddest part of the majority decision is that the court cited the Supreme Court’s 1938 Missouri ex rel. Gaines v. Canada as precedent. Instead of admitting African Americans into the University of Missouri Law School, the state gave them a voucher they could use to attend law school elsewhere. The Supreme Court ruled that this violated the equal-protection clause, stating that “a state may not shift its equal protection duties to another state.”

    This is the first time the Gaines has been cited in an abortion case, and it’s easy to see why: The case is a very poor parallel. The main difference is that running a law school is a function of the state; providing abortions is not. The Supreme Court’s decisions in Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey have given women a right to an abortion. However, they did not mandate that states had to provide abortions. If the last abortion clinic in Mississippi closed on its own, the state would not be obligated to start opening them up itself….

    It would be unfortunate if Mississippi’s Department of Health would be unable to completely enforce various health and safety rules because of this ruling.

  • Saynsumthn’s Blog says Life Dynamics, Inc. has launched a national litigation plan “to educate attorneys on how they can help stop the scandal of family planning centers covering up for men who rape children.”

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  • At The Vine, Breeanne Howe writes about her experience attending a forum entitled, “Does God Love Women Who Get Abortions?” at a Netroots Nation convention. Netroots is known as a “progressive” online and in-person forum for using technology to influence public debate. Given that Democrats booed the idea of any inclusion of God in their official platform, Howe thought the topic would be interesting – and it was. She says the forum’s title question was the only thing the panel seemed to get right: yes, God loves women who have abortions. Howe also exposes the less-than-Christian views espoused by the purported Christians on the panel, along with the fact that abortion advocates are finding it necessary to change their euphemisms for supporting abortion:

    When I arrived, panelist Carolyn Meagher (who isn’t sure she buys the resurrection story!), of First Congregational United Church of Christ (a self-described progressive, inclusive, spiritually alive servant community), was speaking about how churches seek to keep women down. She called it “Kitchen, Church, Kids” which she for some reason shortened to KKK and then equated with Nazi Germany. So to recap, five minutes into the panel the traditional church had been compared to Nazis. We were obviously at the start of an interesting ride….

    My suspicion about Meagher was confirmed at the close of the panel. Democrats have a habit of changing their language when the current language is found out by the majority. In other words, once people understand they are talking about killing babies they need to use different words – as if saying it another way makes it something different. So in ending, Meagher reminded the audience that the term “reproductive justice” should be used instead of pro-choice. In that way they can justify baby murder as a human right.

[Photos via Operation Rescue, The Vine]

“It’s not just Hobby Lobby: the pro-life movement is winning”

Pro-life movement is winning

Monday’s Hobby Lobby decision is part of a deeper trend: even as Obamacare worked to expand access to contraceptives, decisions by both the courts and state governments have left American women with less access to reproductive health care than they did four years ago.

Since 2010, states have moved aggressively to restrict access to abortion and taken new steps to defund family planning programs. Advocates on both sides of the issue describe the wave of changes as unprecedented.

~ Sarah Kliff, “It’s not just Hobby Lobby: the pro-life movement is winning,” Vox.com, July 2

[Photo via Vox]

[UPDATE 7/6 7:45p: Interesting… just found another article on this same vein at The Daily Beast, “Ten Reasons Women Are Losing While Gays Keep Winning,” July 6]

Pro-life blog buzz 6-27-14

pro-lifeby Susie Allen, host of the blog, Pro-Life in TN, and Kelli

  • At Secular Pro-Life, Rebecca Stapleford, who is autistic and physically disabled, writes an excellent article about the pervasive philosophy of ableism in society, and how it is devaluing to life both in and out of the womb:
    Simply put, ableism is a prejudice, much like sexism or racism. Unlike most other prejudices, ableism can often be well-intentioned. For instance, a doctor denying lifesaving treatment to a severely disabled infant is often acting out of compassion, believing that the child’s life is not worth living. However, such an assumption ignores the fact that many severely disabled individuals do find their lives to be worth living, and this scenario involves an able-bodied individual forcing their assumptions about the kind of life that is worth living onto a disabled person — a textbook example of able-bodied power and privilege….

    If we want to create a truly pro-life society, we must not only establish the humanity of the unborn and their right to life, but the right of all human beings to life and non-discriminatory medical care, regardless of how much we cost or how productive we are.

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  • Saynsumthn’s Blog notices that a new Planned Parenthood in New York appears to be wooing the business of the LGBT community:
    According to the Star Gazette, on the second floor is business offices and space for youth and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered groups.Planned Parenthood told the paper that an example of designing to meet program needs, restrooms were designed with care for transgendered people in mind, according to Maureen Kelly, vice president for programming and communications. For about 18 months, PPSFL Ithaca’s center has provided health care including hormones for transgendered people, the first Planned Parenthood affiliate in New York to do so.
  • At National Review, Michael J. New refutes abortion advocate Robin Marty’s claims about the unintended pregnancy rate. Marty believes that “political efforts are preventing consistent contraception use” and that Republicans are to blame because of their attempts to “prevent insurers from covering contraception and to defund family-planning providers.” New says “the facts lend little support to her argument.”
  • Wesley J. Smith points out that Wisconsin Democrats now officially embrace the culture of death in their 2014 platform, which states, “We believe in freedom of reproductive choice, family planning, and the individual’s right to choose death with dignity including physician‐assisted end‐of‐life”.
  • Right to Life of Michigan spots a “whoops” in the Detroit Free Press, whose editorial board supports abortion. They originally referred to the death of a woman’s “unborn baby” in a story about a traffic accident. The term was quickly changed to “unborn fetus”, but the link still uses the term “baby”.
  • At Reproductive Research Audit, Dr. Jacqueline Harvey examines how New York’s newly proposed Women’s Equality Act is simply another version of the defeated Reproductive Health Act, which supported late-term abortion and generally lowered the standard of care for women:
    Ultimately, the proposed Women’s Equality Act achieves the same dangerous goals as the Reproductive Health Act, only repackaged to be more concise and more misleading. The Women’s Equality Act, just like the Reproductive Health Act would endanger women of all ages by lowering medical standards for first trimester abortion, increasing the legality of dangerous late-term abortions, and removing stiff penalties for violence against pregnant women.There is not compelling evidence that Women’s Equality Act presents any benefits, but rather that this bill is a threat to the health and welfare of women of New York state.

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  • Pro-Life Wisconsin rejoices in the closure of the Planned Parenthood facility in Fond du Lac (pictured right). 5 down, 22 to go:
    These clinic closures are no accident — they’re the direct result of Pro-Life Wisconsin’s efforts to de-fund Planned Parenthood in the state budget. And de-fund them we did. In the last bi-ennial budget, we successfully eliminated $1 million in funding from Planned Parenthood.PLW also credits the prayerful and persistent public witness of the pro-lifers in the area.

[Photos via Saynsumthn’s Blog and doorcountyadvocate.com]

Maryland county forced to pay $375k in legal fees for targeting pregnancy care centers

check Montgomery County Tepayac pregnancy care center pro-life abortion NARALUPDATE, 6/24, 10:40a: More good news! As reported by CBNNews.com today:

A federal district court struck down an Austin, Texas, anti-pregnancy care law that forced pro-life pregnancy care centers to post messages that encourage women to go elsewhere.

Another win for Alliance Defending Freedom and pro-life!

6/19 12:52p: This decision should go a long way in dissuading government bodies from passing unconstitutional ordinances that attempt to muzzle the life-saving work of pregnancy care centers.

Such ordinances may hurt their municipal pocketbooks.

A federal district court has ordered Montgomery County, Maryland, to pay $375,000 in legal fees to Centro Tepayac Silver Spring Women’s Center after the pregnancy care center won its 2010 lawsuit against the county for violating its right to free speech.

The ordinance attempted to force the pregnancy care center to post signage if counselors were nonmedical personnel, while giving a pass to nonmedical counselors at family planning clinics like Planned Parenthood.

The concept for this ordinance was provided by constitutionally-challenged NARAL.

After the ordinance was first introduced in Baltimore in 2009, a few other abortion-obsessed local bodies in Austin (Texas), Montgomery County, New York City, and San Francisco jumped on the bandwagon, only to be stopped in their tracks by pro-life lawsuits, all of which are still pending but have received preliminary affirmation. (Note: While dismissing some of  San Francisco’s First Resort pregnancy care center’s claims, a judge has allowed its “equal protection” claim of viewpoint discrimination to proceed.)

Since the prc ordinance microburst between 2009-11, no other local or county government in the U.S. has been so obtuse as to follow NARAL down the financially painful primrose path.

If NARAL were so sure of its “investigations” and ordinance, it would offer to cover legal expenses. Not.

Tepayac was represented by the great attorneys at Alliance Defending Freedom.