Tag Archives: Blog for Choice Day

Ask Them What They Mean By “Choice” Day 2013

565600_10200344040269360_2012432767_nUPDATE 1/24, 10:30a: Thanks to all who participated, whether by the many great posts I read on your blogs (links below), or on Facebook, or on Twitter (where the conversation at #Tweet4Choice is still going strong!).

I think our effort this year was particularly impactful given the dust up in the pro-abortion community over the word “choice.”

Thanks again for doing such a great job pushing back on their euphemismistic cover-up of preborn murder.

1/21, 3:10p: In response to NARAL’s Blog for Choice Day, we are sponsoring our third annual Ask Them What They Mean When They Say “Choice” Day – tomorrow.

All online pro-lifers are invited to join in!

Read backstory here.

This year we are expanding beyond bloggers to the online pro-life community at large – you!

Click to join the event on Facebook here.

By doing so you will become part of a pro-life contingent that will challenge abortion supporters tomorrow, January 22, whenever and wherever we see them use the word “choice” online.

If on Twitter, use the hashtag #Tweet4Choice for all tweets tomorrow, which NARAL has designated for its Blog for Choice Day, the impetus for our day.

Thanks to Planned Parenthood we have added fodder for discussion tomorrow. Almost two weeks ago PP announced it was abandoning the term, “pro-choice.” You might want to ask “choice” advocates about that.

Thanks to bloggers who have signed up to blog on what “choice” really means tomorrow. So far they include:

A Catholic Mom in Hawaii

A Single Drop in the Ocean

A Star of Hope

A Voice for Hope

Abby Johnson

Aloha Life Advocates

Americans for the Life of the Nation

Canadian Centre for Bio-Ethical Reform

Candid Catholic Living

Catholic Bandita

Catholic Sistas

Catholic View

Crazy Cat Lady Mews

Eating Slowly

Family Research Council

Freedom Eden

Health & Home & Heritage

Josiah Concept Ministries

Let It Sparkle

Left Coast Refugee

Life Issues Institute

LifeNews.com

Live Action

Operation Rescue

Out My Front Door

Outside the Asylum

Post-Abortion Walk

Pro-Life in TN

Rai’s Mundo

Rosary Mom

Secular Pro-Life

SoapboxFive

Speaking 4 Life

Spiritual Workout

Stand for Life

Stand True

Star Studded Super Step

ThatMom.com

The Guiding Star Project

The Reformed Pro-Lifer

The Will County News

Tim Harlow

TN Smart Girl

Tradition Family Property Student Action

Victory Girls

Vital Signs

Wy Blog

Planned Parenthood abandons term “pro-choice”

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Pro-lifers have always disdained the term “pro-choice,” because it is intentionally ambiguous. It lets abortion supporters off the hook.

Now, apparently even “pro-choice” has become radioactive.

On January 9, with carefully controlled fanfare (no press release, hand-picked reporters), Planned Parenthood announced it was abandoning the term “pro-choice.” From Buzz Feed:

“Pro-choice” isn’t as misleading, but it doesn’t have the same strong ring to it as “pro-life,” either. Planned Parenthood Executive Vice President Dawn Laguens spoke about the problematic use of “choice” at a press briefing Wednesday, explaining how women once had way fewer choices than they do today. Now, she said, maybe “‘choice’ as word sounds frivolous.”

“Pro-choice” has certainly been taking more and more of a beating in polls. This year a record low 41% of Americans said they considered themselves “pro-choice” in Gallup’s annual survey.

This is not necessarily because people are abandoning abortion support, says PP. It is because people are confused about the terminology.  Explains Jezebel:

When Planned Parenthood polled Americans to figure out how they felt about the labels, the results were confusing, because people found the labels confusing: for example, in one 2012 poll, 35% of voters who identified as pro-life also said they didn’t think Roe v. Wade should be overturned. In another, 12% of online survey takers said they were both pro-life and pro-choice, while another 12% didn’t want to use those terms, and 40% said “it depends on the situation” when asked about their moral opinions on abortion.

Actually, some pro-lifers have been drawing a similar conclusion, as I’ve mentioned before.

To clarify terms and also keep abortion in the spotlight, “we are moving away from using ‘pro-life’ to ‘anti-abortion’ or ‘abortion abolitionist,'” wrote Kristan Hawkins, president of Students for Life of America, to me in an email.

“They don’t want the word abortion to be used, and we want to keep putting it in their face,” added Hawkins. “Anti-drunk driving groups aren’t pro-sober driver groups. Anti-smoking groups aren’t pro-clean air groups.” (Also read this new manifesto by Operation Rescue’s Troy Newman and Cheryl Sullenger.)

But as elements of the pro-life movement aim for more specificity, PP will aim for even less, trying to reshift an already shifty debate away from its prized morally relativist term, which, thanks to pro-life efforts is no longer relativist but negative, to morally relativist dialogue.

“And so Planned Parenthood’s newest messaging will be moving away from the language of choice,” announced Buzz Feed, adding:

Rather than selecting a new term to replace “pro-choice,” Planned Parenthood hopes to move beyond such terms entirely and present abortion as something too complicated to be divided into two sides. A soon-to-be-released Planned Parenthood video takes this new approach, casting labels like pro-life and pro-choice as limiting and abortion as a complex and personal decision. “We just don’t know a woman’s specific situation,” says the ad (not yet online). “We’re not in her shoes.”

More from Jezebel:

Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards… was also in attendance to help introduce the organization’s upcoming advertising campaign, which will highlight how complex and personal the decision to have an abortion can be with taglines such as “Only you know what it’s like to walk in your shoes” and “Decisions about reproductive health are personal. You can help keep them that way.”

Back to Buzz Feed:

Richards noted that a nuanced statement about women making their own decisions isn’t exactly bumper-sticker ready. Still, she argued that talking about abortion in this way has allowed the group to reach people who don’t necessarily consider themselves pro-choice: “It’s an opportunity to talk to an enormous number of people we haven’t been talking to as much as we should.”

To be sure, this move is both a political and a business decision on PP’s part as well as an attempt to mitigate damaging polls.

But note who is PP targeting in particular. Minorities. Read the fine print in both these graphs – “African American and Hispanic oversamples”…

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Pro-lifers may be tempted to scoff at PP’s new strategy. It does indeed reflect a victory on our part. We have made the term “pro-choice” synonymous with “pro-abortion.”

This also means that despite the other side’s best efforts there has been no change in public opinion in the past 40 years, when abortion proponents first scrambled to counter “pro-life” with an “anything-but-abortion” phrase. The fact is people still don’t like abortion.

imageAnd I do wonder whether PP brought other abortion groups in on its pretty monumental new strategy or went rogue.

Such a decision must makes things uncomfortable for NARAL Pro-Choice America, for instance, which just announced its annual “Blog for Choice Day.”

Nevertheless, with its enormous PR operation and financial means to focus test new phraseology and ad campaigns to diabolical perfection, PP remains a dangerous abortion advocate.

[HT: KH; top image via Jezebel

Final Update: Ask Them What They Mean by “Choice” Day

UPDATE 1/30, 7:12a: We blindsided and overwhelmed NARAL last year with our “Ask Them What They Mean by ‘Choice'” Day, but this year the group was more prepared. They signed up 1/3 more blogs to participate and tried to keep up with our counter-tweets. 

But we forced them to think about what “choice” really stands for, whether they wanted to or not. And NARAL will never ever again be able to euphemistically celebrate the anniversary of Roe v. Wade online unanswered.

The Washington Post’s Dana Milbank noted NARAL’s “Blog for Choice Day” in his list of “carnivals” surrounding the terrible anniversary.

Thanks to all who blogged, tweeted, and Facebooked their groups to remind them what “pro-choice” actually means.

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Stanek Sunday quote (in honor of Blog for Choice Day): “Choose life, so *you* and your children may live.”

This day I call the heavens and the earth as witnesses against you that I have set before you life and death, blessings and curses. Now choose life, so that you and your children may live.

~ Deuteronomy 30:19, New International Version

Let’s help NARAL “put a face to our cause”

Earlier today Kathleen Gilbert at LifeSiteNews.com took note of NARAL’s new media campaign, “Putting a face to our cause.” Click to enlarge…

The instructions are simple. Email a graphic or picture to hall33ready@photos.flickr.com, and it will automatically upload to NARAL’s flickr site.

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Today! “Ask Them What They Mean By ‘Choice’” Blog Day

FINAL UPDATE, 1/24, 5:30a: I continued to receive requests to participate in our “Ask Them What They Mean By ‘Choice'” Blog Day from pro-lifers even as the day ended. I have updated the list to showcase the 111 pro-life bloggers who used January 21 to expose “choice” as the code word for killing preborn innocence children with only 2-1/2 days notice.

NARAL posted its list of 90 participants for its “Blog for Choice” Day that morning, fewer than ours with much more notice.

And, as previously discussed, we completely overwhelmed the pro-aborts on Twitter.

This was quite a positive learning experience for me, and I have used the example of what you accomplished by this endeavor many times the past couple days here in Washington when discussing online pro-life activism with friends and colleagues.

Perhaps liberals owned social media back in the day but no more, that’s for sure. I think this was definitely an indicator that pro-lifers have come into our own for online advocacy of the sanctity of preborn human life.

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